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Eyadini informal settlement in Philippi spills over railway line

"Some come here because their shacks get flooded … Others leave their family houses because they are too cramped," said Boyisi. "We delight in staying here as we don't pay rent. Crime is non-existent and no one has reported a shack burglary or robbery to us leaders."

The Eyadini informal settlement on the railway lines in Philippi, Cape Town has shot up as backyarders from Samora Machel, Kosovo, Marikana, Philippi East and other areas flock to the site.

Currently, 1000 households are living there and the shacks are now spreading along the railway lines towards Nyanga station.

Siya Boyisi, a community leader revealed that: “At weekends, this place becomes a hive of activity as former backyarders coming in bakkies offload their building materials and noisily put up their shacks.”

Newcomers at the settlement first mark out their plots and put up their shacks before introducing themselves and getting registered on the list of Eyadini shack dwellers.

“Some come here because their shacks get flooded … Others leave their family houses because they are too cramped,” said Boyisi. “We delight in staying here as we don’t pay rent. Crime is non-existent and no one has reported a shack burglary or robbery to us leaders.”

Prasa spokesperson Riana Scott said: “The invasion of Prasa land is illegal and dangerous … The disposal of wet waste onto the tracks compromises the underlying rail infrastructure and poses a risk to safe train operations.”

Mayco Member for Human Settlements Malusi Booi said Prasa turned down the City’s offer to remove the residents earlier this year.

More: new24

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